Discussion

Tomorrow I begin my second round of 100 Days of Morning Writing.

While they will be focused on SALLY FORTH, I will of course continue my work on THE GOLDEN GOOSE EGGS including an update to the Puss-in-Boots "teaser" article HERE plus the "translation" from this project available as a free download HERE.

As you may have intuited from this update (and possibly learned following the Narratemes campaign), I have changed up how I choose which project comes next. My priority focus remains on one project at a time of course, but instead of queuing campaigns I decide on the next campaign as the current one nears its end based on both audience input and the course of action which makes the most sense to me.

Otherwise, I’m getting too far ahead of myself too soon and not allowing room for life’s little surprises. As I continue to develop the MASTER CAT method, I continue to implement and iterate and make the best possible work for you.

Happy questing,
Rose

As promised, I have information and news for you:

NEWS — 31 Days of Narratemes: a guided journal for questing the crap out of your daily life is now in Draft mode here on Inkshares. As soon as it has 3 followers, I will launch the funding campaign. The welcome/intro chapter is up now, tomorrow I will post the first proper lesson.

INFO — My plan is to campaign for this guided journal (which is purely in the editing stage at this point) while writing a memoir in the abecadło style (a Polish literary genre of ABC book). After the campaign for 31 Days of Narratemes is complete, I will draft-and-campaign for The ABCs of Hoarding Like a Dragon while working to complete Puttin’ the Puss in Boots (the memoir acting as a sort of palate-cleansing project). Then, I will campaign for the Master Cat method.

So, proper/public progress on this project is slated for 6 months from now.

Also, as part of staying accountable to myself and you, I have begun livestreaming my day-to-day. It’s one of the least interesting things ever. Who wants to watch a writer sit and write all day and take time out to eat and read and prevent brain-fry? But, I just want the info out there.

Good journey, my friends.

Hear, ye! Hear, ye!

My apologies for the delay in getting this update to you. 

As I began writing Puttin’ the Puss in Boots I was still testing many of the principles it contains (which are golden, in my opinion, obviously). But the process of iterating through each of those principles lead me down a sort of rabbit-hole to see what sort of Foundation of Focus was underlying it all.

You see, while it’s all well and good to discover the principles of productivity in order to meet external goals, you won’t find satisfaction in any of your achievements if you’re unable to marry them to your internal goals. That’s right! In order to be really and truly and satisfyingly productive, you’re gonna need a framework of self-help/self-care.

"Oh, no," you may be thinking, "she’s gone off the woo-end."

You’re probably right. But, we all know that we are our own worst enemies, and we need a way to quest through that nonsense. Specifically, we need to:

  1. put a name to that enemy (SPOILER: it’s your subconscious mind); 
  2. learn how to communicate effectively with the enemy; and,
  3. negotiate our way towards a long term alliance that will help to steer you clear of future self-sabotage.

Since this particular questing framework is foundational to the MASTER CAT method of Puttin’ the Puss in Boots, I’ll be making a new project for it here on Inkshares. As soon as it’s live, I’ll let you know PLUS I’ll give you certain intel to help you keep me honest.

Good journey, my friends — Rose

 xwlqivz Rose Jermusyk · Author · added over 1 year ago
History Will Always Repeat Itself, That’s Why We Need to Question Our Narratives Regularly

Last month I had a breakthrough which lead to the first significant progress in cleaning my personal space in years. Understandably I was excited and the excitement provided further momentum to get things done.

I promised to take a break for cleaning before getting back to writing, so this is totally relevant, please indulge me.

I reorganized all the clothes (including my sweetie’s) and the laundry "collection" system so no more clothes lying around.

I re-established homes for every individual book in the apartment so that if a book is not in use I know where it goes so I don’t end up with stacks of books all over the place (as lovely as that sight may be).

I even made plans for using oversized IKEA grocery bags to house all the food (because I live in a tiny studio) so I can keep them away from the heat of the oven/stove and the steam of the stove/sink and thereby help all the food things to stay fresher longer (plus make more room for all my beloved baking/cooking equipment in the cupboards).

Before I get to the kitchenette though there are other steps that need to happen first - just logistically- specifically putting away all my papers and magazines into my bank boxes (for which I’ve had drop-folders at the ready for years).  This bit has been a struggle. The which struggle begat a new struggle.

If I’m not sure exactly what steps to take in exactly what order with the boxes I shouldn’t work on it until I do know. If I’m not cleaning, I should be writing because I’m only not writing in order to get this cleaning done. But I might look dishonest or unable to walk-the-walk if I don’t get the cleaning done before getting back to the writing.

That’s what’s known as a compulsion loop. The reason you haven’t heard from me was because I was trapped in my head and then I was talking to therapists and generally questing my way to an official diagnosis of OCD (subtype sinner/doubter).

I do, also, have physical compulsions, but none of my compulsions are so disruptive to my life as the one where I just plain get stuck in my head unable to decide what to do next. I’ve been struggling with this for years and searching for answers for years (it hid so well because I’m a devout Catholic who grew up in a Catholic household and attended a Catholic elementary school and it’s not a subtype you hear a lot about).

This diagnosis ends a 20-year quest to answer the quest of why I can’t do what everyone else is doing exactly the way they’re doing it. And now that I have this diagnosis I can more clearly see the root cause of all my actions and inactions.

THIS BOOK IS GOING TO GET WRITTEN GODDAMMIT. It’s just not going to be published through Inkshares. The crowdfunding setup while invigorating is also crippling.

You know what’s invigorating without being crippling? My email list. All readers of my email list will get a free PDF of Puttin’ the Puss in Boots’ first draft as soon as it’s completed, plus access to a library of resources including the downloadable journal Question Your Narrative, Choose Your Adventure which has already been created.

I just need to negotiate a few things with my OCD before I can share it, like getting this book back into Draft mode and letting you know the place to be if you - like me - want to see this book finished.

Thank you all for your understanding as I quest my way to Fairy Tale Living with OCD,

Rose

Fun Fact about Questing: it literally applies to all of the things.

You can quest your way through personal development, job-hunting, meal-planning, book-writing, and - as I started implementing these past few days - cleaning your house once and for all.

Stick with me on this one, I have a point.

I’ve spent my entire life being terrible at picking up after myself. Terrible at maintaining tidyness even if I have a chance at starting from a place of zero mess. My brain would immediately start picking up all the items around me (while my body didn’t move at all) and start planning where each item should live and then someone - a parent or sibling or someone else equal parts well-meaning and impatiently annoyed - would tell me to stop "over-analyzing" and "just get it done."

The "just do it" mantra is incredibly flawed. 

It’s actually easy to just do something because "doing" implies you’ve already started and it’s starting that’s actually the tricky part. I’m in the midst of writing this book and it’s going along really well except every time I sit down to start a new writing session all I see around me is mess.

And when all around I see me is mess, all my brain wants to do is mentally put it all away and then actually put those things away as I imagined doing it. Months ago, I put aside the negative associations with over-analyzing and figured out the order of steps that allow me to clean all the dishes in my house in one day (after a month of slowly making all them dirty and then stacking them around the kitchenette, like you do).

Just the process of brainstorming this book helped me see how I had step-by-step quested my way to a simple system of taking care of my little kitchen. Now, struggling to start a writing session so I can just write the book, I’m constantly looking at the rest of my messy abode and not doing anything about it, or puttering as a means of procrastination.

Puttering is procrastination, so-called "over-analyzing" is a way of visualizing a task from beginning to end and seeing yourself do all the work and therefore building the mental strength to get it done. My brain has finally made the very direct connection of over-analyzing as a visualization exercise (a thing which friggin’ brain surgeons and olympic athletes do to prep themselves before heading into the ER or onto the playing field).

I’m writing a book about questing the crap out of your daily life and it’s making my whole body want to quest the crap out of all the things in my life. The book is - essentially - preaching, while the cleaning I am hereby taking a week to get good and done is practice.

And how could I possibly ask you to practice what I preach, without being willing to do the same for myself.

So, no chapter this week. Just a note of hope to anyone who was told to go against their "over-analyzing" nature. Because in storytelling we call that world-building and that is everything.

Next week I plan on boasting a clean apartment along with the next chapter segment!

Good journey, my friends, til we meet again,
Rose

Chapter Three is begun!

I am really very excited for chapter three - undoubtedly the longest chapter of the book - because we finally get to meet the cat and get moving on what makes the cat such an amazing example of the trickster/quester we should strive to be in our lives.

Did you know that the miller’s youngest son originally wanted to kill the cat and eat it as his final meal? He wasn’t even about to eat the cat, he was just sitting around lamenting about how after eating the cat he would starve to death and the cat - perfectly positioned to run away to freedom - stuck around and then went on to do so much more.

But, first things first my dear, click this link to read the start of Chapter Three: UNTIL the cat starts talking, and let us get talking about getting our heads in the game. It’s a rough first draft, but it is so worth it for the quick and dirty on my 5-Finger Method for Getting a Grip.

Happy Questing!

Oh, and if you want to share this with your interneighbors, I would be much obliged. Twitter, Facebook, MySpace, Facespace, whatever you hip kids are into these days.

Hey Neighbors!

We have officially made it to Step Three: The First Draft and that means every week you get to go right to the good stuff.

As you may recall of Chapter One: FIRST the miller is dead, I introduced the issue of societal positioning (doesn’t that sound stiff?) and how the model we’re currently working with is more than a little outdated. Note: I may go more in depth about the education system adding summer vacation to "accommodate" kids who were needed to work the family farms of the day. 

With Chapter Two: THEN the youngest son gets stuck I go into a little more detail as to the experience of being human being trying to make their way by means of outdated societal machinery. You could say these first two chapters work as a sort of tag team introduction to the book as a whole. Yet, this second chapter very clearly points us in the direction of what is needed to move forward.

I’d like to reiterate that these chapters are from the first draft of the whole book. In future drafts I will be fleshing them out and giving them even more substance. One way I plan on doing that is by incorporating the resource of Narratemes as a tool for daily questing, which you can learn all about through Periscope.tv/RoseJermusyk where I make every effort to go live every day.

We made it, you guys! We are in first draft mode and now all that’s left to do is go out and get more people excited to read this book with you. So go forth and share this post, the chapters, and the project as a whole with all your inter-neighbors!

Good journey, my friends, til we meet again,
Rose.

NEWS

This will be the last of the "Research" updates. That’s right! Starting next week I will be posting a chapter a week until the first draft of this little beauty is done.

So now, for the last of my beloved notes and quotes:


Step Two: "Research"; WOOING the most beautiful princess, SPREADING the word around hard, and RESPECTING the richest ogre

I have a lovely selection of wordy bits and bobs for you this week; many from Seth Godin, a few from my own head, and a few from fiction because what is fiction if not a reflection of reality?

“Find the discipline to build your projects like you won’t be able to run ads to make them succeed. A product that sells itself, that’s remarkable, that spreads. Then consider running ads as if you don’t need them.” Seth Godin

“Trust is the biggest hurdle. And trust largely comes from social proof … You can focus the proof on a tiny cohort, so that it has more impact … Mostly, you can work to build something that’s worth trusting.” Seth Godin

“You still need permission, still need to seek remark ability, still need to create something that matters.” Seth Godin

“Striking a chord … the resonance of multiple cords, more than one vibrating together. That’s rare, and worth seeking out. It probably won’t happen is you don’t do it on purpose.” Seth Godin

“It’s the rare combination of poet & killer - he who does courageous, creative work AND finds courageous, creative ways to sell it - who doesn’t just get rich, but makes the world richer.” Ash Ambirge

“It’s not just about managing your workload and taking breaks, it’s just as important to manage the energy sources around you.” Dr. Henry Cloud

“The undeniable reality is that how well you do in life and business depends not only on what you do and how you do it … but also on who is doing it with you.” Dr. Henry Cloud

“If you want people to become passionate, engaged in a field, transformed by an experience - you don’t test them, you don’t lecture them and you don’t force them. Instead, you create an environment where willing, caring individuals can find an experience that changes them.” Seth Godin

“People like us do things like this.” Seth Godin

“The secret of leadership is simple: Do what you believe in. Paint a picture of the future. Go there. People will follow.” Seth Godin

“I skated to where the puck was going to be, not where it was.” Wayne Gretzky

Timothy D. Ludwig & E. Scott Geller found that a lack of feedback loops for short-term goals resulted in the immediate loss of motivation for the performer.

“The bigger the dream, the more important the team.” Robin Sherma

“For every disciplined effort there is a multiple reward.” Jim Rohn

“ … if you want to improve, you should actively seek feedback. And that feedback, if it’s more than just carping, will be constructive. … If you’re afraid of feedback, it’s probably not going to arrive as often as you’d like it to.” Seth Godin

“The best way to change long-term behavior is with short-term feedback. … Advances turn more heads than royalty streams do.” Seth Godin

Build in “some capturing, revaluation, and reprocessing time to keep you in balance. There is simply no way to do this necessary regrouping while you’re trying to get everyday work done.” David Allen, Getting Things Done

Feedback loop
 - 1 - Evidence: behavior is measured / captured / stored
 - 2 - Relevance: seeing the data in context
 - 3 - Consequence: context affects options
 - 4 - Action: a clear moment/opportunity to recalibrate

Dynamic display “Your Speed” - mindfulness

“It’s a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don’t keep your feet, there’s no knowing where you might be swept off to.” C.S. Lewis via Bilbo Baggins

“Conscience makes cowards of us all because it is itself cowardly.” Adam Phillips

“It is imperative to have uncertainty as a fundamental part of your inner nature.” Richard Feynman

“Don’t be afraid of fears. They’re not there to scare you. They’re there to let you know that something is worth it.” C. Joybell C.

“Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.” Winston Churchill

“Happiness lies in the joy of achievement and the thrill of creative effort.” Franklin D. Roosevelt 

Step Two: "Research"; IMPRESSING the reigning monarch

The difference between persisting for yourself and proving yourself to "gatekeepers" is really pretty incredible, check out my best notes and quotes on the matter:

“That which one has set oneself to do, one should not relinquish on the grounds of absence of mind or distraction.” Leo Tolstoy

“How we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives.” Annie Dillard

“The middle of things is less exciting than the beginning and less dramatic than the end.” Andrew Solomon

“Add up the short runs … and you’re left with the long run. It’s going to be the long run a lot longer than the short run will last.” Seth Godin

“Just do the little things to make the lives of people around you better.” Simon Sinek

“Making things promotes psychological well-being.” + “Process is important for happiness because when w make, repair, or create things we feel vital and effective.” Psychology Today 

“To practice any art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow. So do it.” Kurt Vonnegut

“No matter in what direction you move as an artist, it’s important to keep going.” kristin.youdesignme

“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.” Aristotle

“Persistence is the twin sister of excellence. One is a matter of quality; the other, a matter of time.” Japanese proverb

“Fast starts are never as important as a cultural hook, consistently showing up and committing to a process.” Seth Godin

“Show up, show up, show up and after a while the muse shows up, too.” Isabel Allende

“Tiny incremental improvements can produce dramatic results.” Nick Loper

How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time.

“Doing things with rigor takes effort, but not everything you put effort into id done with rigor. Rigor is a focus on process. Paying attention to not just how you do things, but why. Rigor requires us to never use an emergency as an excuse. It is a process for the long haul, the work of a professional.” Seth Godin

Thoreau - the person who works hard doesn’t exert himself all day but has this leisure around accomplishing the task - a hen lays one eggs then feeds herself on things that feed the next egg

“in virtually every discipline, one of the most telling features of a dominant performer is the routine use of recovery periods.” Josh Waitzkin

“You have to know how to accept rejection and reject acceptance.” Ray Bradbury
There’s no glass ceiling when it comes to creating, stained or otherwise.

“I’m just an individual who doesn’t feel that I need to have somebody qualify my work in any particular way. I’m working for me.” David Bowie

“You don’t have a choice about whether or not others have power in your life, but you do have a choice as to what kind of power others are going to have.” Dr. Henry Cloud 

NEWS

Writing is happening, people. It’s happening! And I’ve got a sharing schedule set for myself to get some more readers in here and caught up on all our fun.

It would be very neighborly of you if you shared this project in your social media neighborhoods, too. Just saying.

Enjoy this bout of "research"!


Step Two: "Research"; IMPRESSING the reigning monarch

This may be the most varied "research" yet, only one person was repeated and only once! (Take a look to see who it is.)

“That which one has set oneself to do, one should not relinquish on the grounds of absence of mind or distraction.” Leo Tolstoy

“How we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives.” Annie Dillard

“The middle of things is less exciting than the beginning and less dramatic than the end.” Andrew Solomon

“Add up the short runs … and you’re left with the long run. It’s going to be the long run a lot longer than the short run will last.” Seth Godin

“Just do the little things to make the lives of people around you better.” Simon Sinek

“Making things promotes psychological well-being.” + “Process is important for happiness because when w make, repair, or create things we feel vital and effective.” Psychology Today

“To practice any art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow. So do it.” Kurt Vonnegut

“No matter in what direction you move as an artist, it’s important to keep going.” kristin.youdesignme

“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.” Aristotle

“Persistence is the twin sister of excellence. One is a matter of quality; the other, a matter of time.” Japanese proverb

“Fast starts are never as important as a cultural hook, consistently showing up and committing to a process.” Seth Godin

“Show up, show up, show up and after a while the muse shows up, too.” Isabel Allende

“Tiny incremental improvements can produce dramatic results.” Nick Loper

How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time.

“Doing things with rigor takes effort, but not everything you put effort into is done with rigor. Rigor is a focus on process. Paying attention to not just how you do things, but why. Rigor requires us to never use an emergency as an excuse. It is a process for the long haul, the work of a professional.” Seth Godin

Thoreau: the person who works hard doesn’t exert himself all day but has this leisure around accomplishing the task: a hen lays one eggs then feeds herself on things that feed the next egg

“in virtually every discipline, one of the most telling features of a dominant performer is the routine use of recovery periods.” Josh Waitzkin

“You have to know how to accept rejection and reject acceptance.” Ray Bradbury

There’s no glass ceiling when it comes to creating, stained or otherwise.

“I’m just an individual who doesn’t feel that I need to have somebody qualify my work in any particular way. I’m working for me.” David Bowie

“You don’t have a choice about whether or not others have power in your life, but you do have a choice as to what kind of power others are going to have.” Dr. Henry Cloud