Carol D. Marsh
MAY 2017 -- Nowhere Else I Want to Be: A Memoir is chosen a Finalist in the 2017 Next Generation Indie Book Awards, Autobiography/Memoir Category.
Jesse J. Holland, author of The Invisibles: The Untold Story of African American Slaves in the White House; and Black Men Built the Capitol: Discovering African American History In and Around Washington, DC.
Very few people take the time to delve into the plight of those less fortunate, but Carol D. Marsh’s “Nowhere Else I Want to Be” takes us into the lives of the women of Miriam's House—homeless, black and living with AIDS—and gives them a much needed voice in a sometimes cruel and harsh world. Marsh also reveals with unflinching honesty her own struggles as a white, middle-class woman living and working in a culture unfamiliar and sometimes even distressing to her. “Nowhere Else I Want to Be” is required reading for anyone who wants to know about a side of Washington, D.C. rarely seen by tourists or even natives, and a textbook example of the power of the written word crafted by a wonderful writer and even better person.
A&U Magazine / TJ Banks
Marsh paints vivid word-pictures of the women of Miriam’s House, enabling us to enter their lives as much as it is humanly possible to. And we come away from the book moved by both the story she tells and the honesty with which she tells it. 
Cristina Flagg-Cousins, MSW
I was thrilled to hear that Carol would be writing a memoir about Miriam’s House. The world deserves to know the story of that place, both painful and beautiful, tragic and life-giving.
Carol does a masterful job of sharing the story with her readers from an honest and vulnerable place, never mincing words or glossing over the complicated emotions and situations she experienced while at the helm of the organization. This kind of transparency is a rare gift.
Nowhere I'd Rather Be is a must-read for anyone interested in a life dedicated to “the service of others”. Hopefully it will help others to explore their motivation for serving, ask themselves the toughest questions, and ultimately become more self-aware and compassionate citizens – something that is desperately needed in our modern world.Cristina Flagg-Cousins, MSW
David Hilfiker, author of Healing the Wounds: A Physician Looks at his Life; Not All of Us are Saints: A Doctor's Journey with the Poor; and Urban Injustice: How Ghettos Happen.
Carol writes with joy and humor about her years living face-to-face with the gritty, sometimes painful, often joyous realities of those we keep on the margins of our society.
John Dennehy
An important work. Looking forward to this one!
Chris Robinson
Help get this great book to 650 orders by Dec 1
Diane Eatough
I loved it!!  I love your writing style. I enjoyed the bit about Sunday dinners. Having been my babysitter since I was, literally, a baby, I've had the pleasure of knowing Carol the majority of my live. I remember her beautiful singing voice (angels) and her gentle, quiet way. Her and her sisters had THE best barbies!!Having lost touch for way too long, I am pleased to know her again at this point in our lives. I had know this part of her life, but I can truly say that I cannot wait to read this book, and the next. Much love, diane
Andrea Jackson
Giving a voice to those who often don't have one. Love this concept
Rebecca Pert
An important work. Beautifully-written with keen insight and humorous self-awareness.