A Wilderness of Comfort combines historical fiction and modern-day thriller to create a labyrinthine tale of obsession, death, and deceit. It tracks two men—Erich Gunther, a German soldier during WWII; and Maxfield Reynolds, an art consultant in present day—and their parallel pursuit of a set of lost masterpieces painted by some of the world’s most famed Impressionists. But the cost of these works is more than money; it is madness, and blood. And both Erich and Max will have to pay that price . . .

But there’s more . . . The story behind the book . . .

The original draft of A Wilderness of Comfort was written by my father, Lee Levinson, nearly twenty years ago. Though he finished the manuscript, it was never published. He’s also a talented autodidact painter, but to this day he works sixty-plus hours a week as a dentist.

My own story is unusual, as well. From the summer of 2004, to the middle of last December, I’d been living with misdiagnosed Lyme disease. Told I had incurable "fibromyalgia," unable to find ordinary work, my father saved me by offering the financial support I needed while I pursued my passion of writing. Today, as a published author, after nearly a year of significant Lyme recovery, I have taken on the project of rewriting, editing, and finishing the novel that he always wished to produce.

This manuscript is more than a work of fiction. It is an exploration of our common search for joy amidst the upheavals of our lives. And it is a testament of gratitude, from son to father.

Please enjoy A Wilderness of Comfort.